The Suspiria Remake Made Quentin Tarantino Cry

The acclaimed director really enjoyed the new film.

By L.B. Lubomski

In an interview with Italian publication La Repubblica, Suspiria remake director Luca Guadagnino shared a story of how he wowed celebrated film director Quentin Tarantino. Needless to say, he had a particularly strong reaction to the film, praising it and even being brought to tears in the end.

I showed it to Quentin Tarantino. We’ve been friends since our jury duty at the Venice Film Festival. I was nervous but eager to hear his advice. We saw it at his place and his reaction warmed me. He was enthusiastic about it, in the end he was crying and hugged me. Because it’s a horror movie but also a melodrama, my goal was to make you look at the horror without being able to take [your eyes off the screen] because you’re captivated by the characters. Amazon is very happy.

Tarantino is the latest celebrity film buff to show his admiration for Suspiria. Chloë Grace Moretz, one of the film's stars, has gone on to describe the film as "the closest to modern Stanley Kurbrick I've ever seen," while adding that "you're put into a world I can only describe as being like The Shining in a lot of ways where you're just encompassed in a filmmaker's brain." These are bold statements, so we will have to wait until the film's theatrical release on November 2nd to see if it lives up to expectations.

About the Author

L.B. Lubomski

Lawrence "L.B." Lubomski is an avid horror movie fan, gamer, musician, historian, and aspiring author. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, L.B. was exposed to the works of local filmmaker and godfather of zombie cinema George A. Romero early on. He has since developed a particular fondness for Italian zombie/cannibal and slasher films. This passion for horror extends into other media, from survival horror video games such as Resident Evil to horror-inspired musical artists. In his spare time, L.B. pursues many interests including building his collection of vinyl records, action figures, and vintage video games as well as drumming in various local bands.

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